4 Toxins to Avoid This Fall

By October 20, 2017Pet Tips, Prevention, Wellness

By Dr. Shanna Plitt, Veterinarian

We wanted to share a few of the toxins out there this fall season that can prove harmful to your pet. Do your pets a favor and keep them away from the following four toxins!

Rodent Control

We see it every year. Mice and rats start to get cold outside so they seek shelter inside of basements and garages. As a result, the use of mouse and rat poison increases this time of year as well. This poison is highly toxic to pets so please make sure your pets are kept away from these products.

Antifreeze

Antifreeze contains a chemical called ethylene glycol which can destroy their kidneys and prove fatal if even a small amount is consumed by your dog or cat. If you are changing your car’s coolant in the driveway or garage, make sure to clean up any overflows or spills as quickly as possible. This chemical is usually odorless, so your dog or cat might try to lick up a spill for you and end up poisoned, feeling disoriented or nauseous.

Mushrooms

Who knew that fall was not only the season for football, pumpkins, Halloween and flannel – but also the season for mushrooms. Most mushrooms are not toxic, but the toxic mushrooms, which can prove fatal to dogs and cats, are so hard to distinguish that we suggest keeping your pets clear of any environment where mushrooms are growing.

Chocolate 

As Dr. McCafferty discussed in her Halloween blog earlier this week, Halloween is right around the corner and with the spooky costumes comes chocolate! You may be able to hide the Trick or Treat stash from your children, spouse or significant other but your pets sense of smell might get the best of you and your secret stash! Chocolate can be very harmful to dogs and cats, sometimes even proving fatal if not addressed immediately. Chocolate poison can result in symptoms such as diarrhea, vomiting, heavy breathing or even seizures.

If you are concerned that your pet has ingested a deadly toxin, please call your veterinarian at Huffard Animal Hospital immediately or The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center.

 

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